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Pederesen, A. & Sindbæk, S. M. (eds.) (2020). Viking encounters. Proceedings of the Eighteenth Viking Congress, Aarhus: Aarhus University Press.

2020.09.30 | Publication, History and archaeology

Viking encounters. Proceedings of the Eighteenth Viking Congress

New publication by Anne Pedersen (National Museum of Denmark) and Professor MSO and Deputy Director of UrbNet Søren M. Sindbæk.

2020.09.29 | Publication, History and archaeology

Aux armes! A female warrior emerges from the dentistry lab

The Northern Emporium project has virtually reconstructed an armed female figure from casting-mould fragments found at the Viking-Age emporium Ribe. Assistant professor Sarah Croix explains the technical steps of the process and the team's thoughts on the figure's significance.

2020.09.25 | History and archaeology

Postdoctoral fellowships (fixed-term contracts): Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet)

The Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet) is looking to recruit a number of postdoctoral researchers to work on projects within the centre’s research agenda.

Image: Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall

2020.09.24 | History and archaeology, Media coverage

Vikings Weren’t All Scandinavian, Ancient DNA Study Shows

In the popular imagination, Vikings were fearsome blonde-haired warriors from Scandinavia who used longboats to carry out raids across Europe in a brief but bloody reign of terror. But the reality is much more complex, according to an analysis of the genomes of 442 ancient humans from archaeological sites in Scandinavia, the United Kingdom,…

Cover of Nature vol. 585. The cover shows the Sea Stallion, the world’s largest Viking ship reconstruction. The maritime expansion of Scandinavian populations during the Viking Age altered the political, cultural and demographic map of Europe.

2020.09.23 | Publication, History and archaeology

Population genomics of the Viking world

New publication by Ashot Margaryan (University of Copenhagen), Daniel J. Lawson (The University of Bristol), Martin Sikora (University of Copenhagen), Fernando Racimo (University of Copenhagen), Eske Willerslev (University of Copenhagen), Søren M. Sindbæk (UrbNet and Aarhus University) together with colleagues.

2020.09.22 | History and archaeology

Zanzibar's hidden history

A new podcast produced by the Zanzibar excavation team in collaboration with the Department of Antiquities on Zanzibar.

2020.09.17 | Publication, History and archaeology

Hellenistic and Roman Gerasa. The Archaeology and History of a Decapolis City

New publication by Professor and UrbNet Centre director Rubina Raja and Professor Achim Lichtenberger (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster).

VÄSTERGÖTLANDS MUSEUM

2020.09.16 | History and archaeology, Media coverage

DNA analysis of 442 Viking skeletons rewrites the story of Viking culture

The popular notion of the blonde, Scandinavian-looking Viking has just been knocked for six. It turns out that some Vikings were dark-haired and others decidedly mousey. The Vikings actually had a well-mixed gene pool, and some even had southern European and Asian roots.

MARGARYAN ET AL., NATURE, 10.1038/S41586-020-2688-8, ADAPTED BY V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE

2020.09.16 | History and archaeology, Media coverage

‘Viking’ was a job description, not a matter of heredity, massive ancient DNA study shows

It was a Viking saga written in genes. In 2008, construction work on an isolated Estonian beach near the town of Salme uncovered the skeletons of more than 40 powerfully built men. They were buried around 750 C.E. in two ships with Viking-style weapons and treasure—apparently the aftermath of a raid gone wrong. DNA from the bones has now added a…

2020.09.16 | History and archaeology, Media coverage

World's largest DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian

Invaders, pirates, warriors - the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond. Now cutting-edge DNA sequencing of more than 400 Viking skeletons from archaeological sites scattered across Europe and Greenland will rewrite the history books.

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